Serra Site for End Times Therapy

| September 17th, 2013

flyer serra site for end times therapy

Friends and Comrades! Thanks for stopping by on Friday, September 13th, 2013, for the long-awaited opening of the Serra Site for End Times Therapy! You joined us between 9 and 10 p.m. in front of the Carnegie Museum of Art as we embraced the moment, expunged our fears, and explored our connections with the cosmos!

—Tom Sarver, Tobias Madison, Flavio Merlo & Daniel Baumann

As We Install…….Oh Yes…….the 2013 Carnegie International

| August 29th, 2013

homstead 5 by Zoe Strauss
Installation has begun–more to look at soon!

Zoe Strauss is coming to Homestead!

| August 28th, 2013

HISTORICAL HOMESTEAD FLASH! Don’t miss out on it.   "I’m not a humanitarian, I’m a hell-raiser." -Mother Jones  (In response to a speaker who introduced her as “a great humanitarian,” Jones retorted: “Get it straight, I’m not a humanitarian, I’m a hell-raiser.”)

HISTORICAL HOMESTEAD FLASH! Don’t miss out on it.
“I’m not a humanitarian, I’m a hell-raiser.”
- Mother Jones
(In response to a speaker who introduced her as “a great humanitarian,” Jones retorted: “Get it straight, I’m not a humanitarian, I’m a hell-raiser.”)

Zoe Strauss’s portrait studio is about to open in Homestead!

She’s been assembling incredible images, stories, histories, and ideas on the Homesteading blog. The studio opens on Labor Day, and you can catch Zoe in Homestead until the middle of October. If you’re a resident of Homestead, stop by and have your portrait taken! The portraits will find their way into the museum in an installation that involves video, massive wall graphics, and over 200 portraits.

Say hi when you see her around town!

Pierre Leguillon: Dubuffet Typographe/r

| August 21st, 2013

Dubuffet Typographer 05

Dubuffet Typographe/r, Pierre Leguillon’s second project for the 2013 Carnegie International, is dedicated to the French artist and entrepreneur Jean Dubuffet (1901–1985). It investigates the former wine-dealer’s professional acumen, demonstrated by Dubuffet’s creation of Art Brut and culminating in the management of an entire staff working to promote, document, and archive his activities. In the light of today’s obsession with self-promotion, Dubuffet can be understood as a forerunner of artists such as Jeff Koons or Damien Hirst. Once again, Leguillon’s approach follows seemingly marginal paths, which ultimately prove to be unexpectedly revelatory. Travelling to public and private archives such as la Fondation Dubuffet in Paris, the Bibliothèque Kandinsky at Centre Pompidou or to IMEC in Caen, Leguillon has photographed ephemera such as invitations, posters, catalogs, artist’s books, flyers, tickets, and record sleeves. These images were then used to execute a “recadrage“ (re-framing) of Jean Dubuffet and his activities. Like a meticulous “detective,“ Leguillon shows us how “for each project, Dubuffet invented a new way of writing and composing text—quite possibly by simply improvising. By this, he rejected the standardization as imposed by the printing process and typing, an education he himself went through. In books and lithographs, Dubuffet thoroughly sabotaged writing and typography (l’écriture) by fragmenting and distorting it, thus achieving, on a visual level, his plan to destroy language.”

Dubuffet Typographer. A book by Pierre Leguillon. Design by Stéphane De Groef and Pierre Leguillon. Brussels 2013. 330 pages, American dust jacket. ISBN 978-2-930667-05-8 EAN 9782930667058. Price: 20 Euros. Published by (SIC), « Soft Alphabet » Series. (SIC), Brussels, Belgium www.sicsic.be, distributed by Les presses du réel www.lespressesdureel.com

Enter the archive

| July 23rd, 2013

Jeff Koons sculpture being installed during 1988 Carnegie International

Jeff Koons sculpture being installed during 1988 Carnegie International

Some say that the Carnegie Museum of Art was the first museum of modern and contemporary art in the U.S. It is true–as far as American institutions go–the Carnegie has been around the block. It opened in 1895 and a year later started an annual exhibition to bring work by the best and most talented artists to Pittsburgh. We inherited this model of an exhibition and hence thought it pertinent to reflect back on how it all went over these 117 years. Now, enter the archive: a visual history as told through installation photos and films (some seen for the first time), a few choice artworks, and a good amount of text. It opened over the weekend and will be up through the run of the 2013 Carnegie International.

Carnegie International in the 1990s and 2000s

Carnegie International in the 1990s and 2000s

 

Carnegie International in the 1960s

Carnegie International in the 1960s