Archive for the ‘Sculpture’ Category

Cara Erskine and Corey Escoto @ Apartment Talks

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

corey 1

Apartment Talk #14: Cara Erskine and Corey Escoto

On May 21st we hosted enlightening talks by Pittsburgh-based artists Cara Erskine and Corey Escoto, both of whom relocated here some years ago and have since been very active in the local (as well as national) art scene. They drew a big crowd of supporters who stuck it out despite stifling heat, and even dared prolonging the proceedings with some great questions.

Cara presented her sculptures, paintings, and collages that take formal and conceptual cues from sports, pop culture, and feminism. Highlighting some of her works that examine perceptions of gender and identity, Cara discussed the public reception of sports icons like Billie Jean King, a recurring figure in her work. Cara also described the important role that construction plays in the materiality of her work and her overall artistic process, from tiny collages to large-scale paintings. Cara earned her MFA from Yale School of Art in 2002 and has exhibited at The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA; Vox Populi, Philadelphia, PA; Front Room, Cleveland, OH; and has had solo exhibitions at Saint Mary’s College, Notre Dame, IN; and Stanford University, Stanford, CA. She has taught at Carnegie Mellon University and Robert Morris University, and her art criticism has appeared in Dis Magazine. See more of Cara’s work on her website.

Corey talked about his body of experimental, large format analog photographic works created with a recently discontinued Polaroid format. Expanding the zone of instantaneous image production, Corey constructs enigmatic spaces that compress and invert idea, image, and object. These 4×5 instant film prints are unique, multi-exposure proofs created through a process of hand-cutting and registering a series of light-blocking stencils to selectively and sequentially expose the film. As an extension of this process, his sculptures are reverse engineered objects born out of the Polaroids—reifying the cycles, grey areas, and nuances of invention and production. Corey was born in Amarillo, Texas, and his work has been included in many national and international exhibitions at venues such as the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis; FRAC Nord-Pas De Calais, Dunkerque; Galerie de Kunstler, Munich; 7 Days Brunch, Basel; and Regina Rex, Queens, NY. See more of Corey’s work on his website. See also Art21′s blog, featuring a 2009 interview with Corey.

 

 

A playful worm for Carnegie Museum of Art

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

Lozziwurm Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh

Lozziwurm Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh

Are we the only art museum in the world building a playground? Maybe, maybe not, but hey, it started as a wild idea or serious joke (or both) and now kids play out there! We are still puzzled that it happened. I know that you know that it isn’t enough to just have an idea. It needed the thing itself—the Lozziwurm as invented in 1972 by Swiss artist and designer Yvan Pestalozzi. Which isn’t enough either.

It needed Lynn Zelevansky, our visionary director, and the great enthusiasm of Marilyn Russell, our chair and curator for education, and the generosity of Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann, co-chairs of the Friends of the 2013 Carnegie International. But it needed even more than that, it needed the women and men on the ground, Rob Thompson of Terra Design Studio, the crew from Plantscape Inc. and from Technique Architectural Products, and Knoepfel Kunststoffe in Switzerland; it needed Carnegie Museum’s of Art John Lyon, Jeff Lovett, Hannah Silbert, Tony Young, and super MC of organization Sarah Minnaert. Still not enough though—because what’s a play sculpture without children? Well, they came, saw, and conquered it. Last Saturday, hundreds of them! And yes, this is part of The Playground Project of the 2013 Carnegie International opening on October 4, 5, and 6, 2013.

Anahuacalli

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

Like a Mayan pyramid, the Anahuacalli Museum rises from a dense, old neighborhood in the southern environs of Mexico City, a good 1.5-hour taxi ride from your next destination (unless it’s Frida Kahlo’s house and collection a short distance away). Anahuacalli houses Diego Rivera’s collection of pre-Hispanic art and artifacts in glorious display cases spread across mostly small dark rooms made of volcanic stone with mosaicked stone ceilings (and some floors) that weave together symbols of the Teotihuacan culture with the occasional hammer and sickle. Rivera with his friend, the architect and muralist, Juan O’Gorman conceived of the design, although Rivera didn’t live to see its completion. This spring, Kurimanzutto gallery hosted an exhibition of British artist Sarah Lucas’s bodily assemblages made of mostly nylon pantyhose and cotton stuffing contorted and placed on pedestals of stacked adobe bricks, all sourced in Mexico. It’s hard to imagine anything looking bad in Anahuacalli—the name means “House of Energy,” and the feeling of walking through its many halls as you ascend its four floors is one of effervescence met with an air of solemnity.

 

Oi, Inhotim

Monday, May 21st, 2012

The night before my trip to Instituto Inhotim, I flew into Belo Horizonte, the nearest city in the southeastern region of Brazil known as Minas Gerais. The next morning’s journey southward began on a big highway that led to small windy, dusty streets through the town of Brumadinho, to the gates of a former farm now home to Brazil’s largest contemporary art sculpture park-cum-botanical garden. Although normally packed with visitors on the weekends, Inhotim was quiet—it was Mother’s Day. Good for me because there was lots to see. I met my guide Juliana at the visitors center just before 10 AM with the stated desire to see everything. She looked doubtful, but we would try. We set off with a quick pace over a small bridge on a green lake dotted with white swans. I’m not too familiar with the indigenous natural landscape of Brazil (it was only my second trip), but as much as it was beautiful, I could tell this was likely not natural. Indeed, nothing about Inhotim is quite natural, and that is just the beauty of it.

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