Archive for the ‘Film’ Category

Tonight! Yael Bartana, Film & Discussion

Thursday, November 21st, 2013

Yael Bartana And Europe Will Be Stunned

Don’t miss the one-time screening of Yael Bartana’s provocative film trilogy …And Europe Will Be Stunned (2007–11), which imagines the rise of the Jewish Renaissance Movement when 3.3 million Jews move back to Poland. Yael Bartana will discuss the films and answer your questions (5:30–6:30 p.m.: Happy Hour near the artist’s installation at the Grand Staircase; 7–8:30 p.m.: Screening and conversation in the CMA Theater; Cost: $10. Includes admission and one drink ticket).

Also, don’t miss Bartana’s film Summer Camp as part of the 2013 Carnegie International.

And be sure to attend this weekend’s symposium “A Collection of Misfits: Time-Based Media and the Museum,” presented by Carnegie Museum of Art and designed to encourage discourse about the practical and philosophical issues of building, maintaining, exhibiting, and preserving time-based media art collections. Details, register, program

Enter the archive

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013
Jeff Koons sculpture being installed during 1988 Carnegie International

Jeff Koons sculpture being installed during 1988 Carnegie International

Some say that the Carnegie Museum of Art was the first museum of modern and contemporary art in the U.S. It is true–as far as American institutions go–the Carnegie has been around the block. It opened in 1895 and a year later started an annual exhibition to bring work by the best and most talented artists to Pittsburgh. We inherited this model of an exhibition and hence thought it pertinent to reflect back on how it all went over these 117 years. Now, enter the archive: a visual history as told through installation photos and films (some seen for the first time), a few choice artworks, and a good amount of text. It opened over the weekend and will be up through the run of the 2013 Carnegie International.

Carnegie International in the 1990s and 2000s

Carnegie International in the 1990s and 2000s

 

Carnegie International in the 1960s

Carnegie International in the 1960s

 

 

 

Last week to Cast Your Vote!!!

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

2MFF countdown
 
The third installment of the 2-Minute Film Festival at Carnegie Museum of Art is fast approaching, and with only a week left, it’s time for you to rock the vote. For the first time in the history of the festival, we are asking our friends from all stops along the Information Superhighway to help us choose the 2MFF People’s Choice. We have made all 32 videos chosen for the festival available on our website for viewing and voting by you and anyone else in the blogosphere. This year’s theme, “At Play,” inspired submissions from all over the globe that run the gamut of cinematic forms, but you only get ONE VOTE, so be sure to think long and hard before casting your ballot. Online voting will be live right up to the festival screening on Thursday, July 18 (mark your calendars!), and the video that garners the most votes will be rewarded with a fantastic selection of film-centric prizes. Vote virtually, then come actually to watch the short films on the big screen in our courtyard, with a beer and burger in hand. The clock is ticking!

To vote, and for more information on the evening’s events, visit the 2MFF website: http://2mff.cmoa.org/

Tweet us your most playful 6-second Vine using the hashtag #2mff for a chance to be featured on our website!

Philip Leers, Senior Research Associate Time-Based Media Collection

The Film Collection – On view through March 2014

Friday, June 28th, 2013
harry smith_heaven and earth magick 1962

Still from Harry Smith’s Heaven and Earth Magick, 1962

This month we opened our new and improved modern and contemporary collection galleries. The installation is a component of the 2013 Carnegie International (as is the Playground Project, which also opened this month in the Heinz Architectural Center) and highlights the major role the International has played in forming the museum’s collection. As the show has been curated by different individuals over its nearly 120 year history, and as those individuals have chosen to acquire certain things rather than others, the collection has a unique character reflective of personal tastes and interests.  Sometimes major artists were missed, but with the benefit of hindsight, the museum has continued to fill in the gaps through new acquisitions. Works that weren’t in Internationals past are included in the reinstallation as well, to create a cohesive presentation of many of our best works.

Film and video is one facet of artistic practice that showed up late on the International‘s radar, appearing for the first time in the 1985 iteration. In the meantime, the Film and Video department was doing really innovative things, bringing some of the most important filmmakers to Pittsburgh to present their work and building an outstanding collection. Rethinking the collection galleries has given us the opportunity to make room for this frequently overlooked segment of our holdings (and history), so we’ve built an elegant new “black box” space in gallery 14.  Over the course of the next 8 months–through the run of the International– this gallery will be home to a roughly chronological, rotating program of works by 11 major artists (see the full upcoming schedule after the jump). Most of the films that will be on view were acquired during the Film and Video department’s first ten years (1970-1980), and some were presented in person by the filmmaker.

First up: Harry Smith‘s Heaven and Earth Magick (1962), a surreal collage film composed from Victorian-era catalogues and exercise manuals that Smith produced over a period of five years using a randomizing selection process called sortilege, inspired by the Surrealist practice of automatic writing.  Smith adopted a strategic regimen of sleep deprivation, working to the point of exhaustion and then transferring his dreams to film upon waking. The resulting animation revolves around a male magus character who, after injecting a female figure with magic potion, finds she has disintegrated and must be reassembled.

Heaven and Earth Magic includes references to the Kabbalah, 19th-century philology, and the writings of Dr. Wilder Penfield on open-brain surgery and the concept of the Homunculus, evincing Smith’s nearly encyclopedic knowledge of esoterica and mysticism. The artist was an avid collector of everything from pop-up books and forgotten folk records (he famously compiled the Anthology of American Folk Music, released in 1952) to Native American costumes, string figures, and Fabergé eggs. His interest in ethnic artifacts and everyday ephemera, as well as obscure forms of knowledge and the occult, was rooted in a search for universality underlying the diversity of human endeavor.

Stop by and see the film before July 8th, when we’ll switch it out for a compilation of Kenneth Anger‘s early work.

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Belfast Punk Night @ Apartment Talks

Friday, June 7th, 2013

shellshock

Apartment Talk #13: Belfast Punk Night

On May 13th, in collaboration with CMU School of Art, we hosted a Belfast punk event that had been percolating for over a year. I had been wanting to screen a documentary on the subject by John T. Davis, called Shellshock Rock (1979), since Duncan Campbell told me about how influential the film had been for him, but it took ages—and a circuitous train of a million emails—for me to get my hands on a copy. Around the same time as the DVD arrived from the UK, someone posted the whole thing on YouTube. So enjoy with unearned ease, but feel sorry you missed out on the dance party. That’s right: after the screening, DJ John Carson spun some records and people danced. An Apartment first (I think). (more…)