Archive for the ‘2013 Carnegie International’ Category

Wade Guyton. Friday the 13th. Serving Warm-Hearted Drinks

Monday, December 9th, 2013

wade guyton coatroom 2013 carnegie international fin

On Friday, December 13th, 2013, American artist Wade Guyton, assisted by 2013 Carnegie International co-curator Daniel Baumann and supervised by a bartender from Pittsburgh’s Parkhurst Dining empire, will serve you drinks in the Carnegie Museum of Art’s coatroom. Or, if you prefer, Carnegie Museum of Art’s new exhibition space and coatroom. Please join us from 8–11 p.m. for this full-on, intimate, and relaxed soiree! It also includes a reading of texts written by American photographer Joel Sternfeld to accompany the photographs taken for his seminal project Sweet Earth: Experimental Utopias in America.

Among the people lending their voices to Sternfeld we welcome:

Deavron Dailey (artist and facilitator, Braddock Art Lending Collection)
Lauren Goshinski (Co-Founder/Director of VIA | Pittsburgh)
Sherrie Flick (writer)
Cathy Lewis Long (founding Executive Director of The Sprout Fund)
Angela Love (illustrator and teacher)
Jon Reyes (facilitator, Braddock Art Lending Collection)
John Schulman (owner, Caliban Book Shop)
Ed Steck (writer)
Josh Weinstein (filmmaker)

This warm-hearted, pre-Christmas evening also offers an introduction of Sternfeld’s work in the 2013 Carnegie International by co-curator Tina Kukielski, as well as a visit with Wade to the very exclusive Founders Room, where his second contribution to the exhibition is located. Music will be provided by artist and puppeteer Tom Sarver who graciously agreed to play some of his father’s collection of partly obscure singles.

$18 in advance/$20 at the door ($15 students). Call 412.622.3288 for tickets or register online, but don’t miss Friday the 13th!

Tonight! Yael Bartana, Film & Discussion

Thursday, November 21st, 2013

Yael Bartana And Europe Will Be Stunned

Don’t miss the one-time screening of Yael Bartana’s provocative film trilogy …And Europe Will Be Stunned (2007–11), which imagines the rise of the Jewish Renaissance Movement when 3.3 million Jews move back to Poland. Yael Bartana will discuss the films and answer your questions (5:30–6:30 p.m.: Happy Hour near the artist’s installation at the Grand Staircase; 7–8:30 p.m.: Screening and conversation in the CMA Theater; Cost: $10. Includes admission and one drink ticket).

Also, don’t miss Bartana’s film Summer Camp as part of the 2013 Carnegie International.

And be sure to attend this weekend’s symposium “A Collection of Misfits: Time-Based Media and the Museum,” presented by Carnegie Museum of Art and designed to encourage discourse about the practical and philosophical issues of building, maintaining, exhibiting, and preserving time-based media art collections. Details, register, program

Art, Bikes, and Tea

Tuesday, November 12th, 2013

Dog with books

We had our first snow of the season last night, but we won’t let that stop our hotly anticipated bike art tour of Pittsburgh this Saturday. Daniel Baumann and I, along with Bike Pittsburgh, will be your fearless guides through the cold streets. We start at home base, beside the Phyllida Barlow sculpture that is part of the 2013 Carnegie International, then it’s a short jaunt over to Kraus Campo, a garden sculpture designed by Mel Bochner on the Carnegie Mellon campus. Next we cruise (mostly downhill!) over to the South Side, then downtown for a quick break in two of our favorite public plazas, one with chairs made by Scott Burton for the 1985 Carnegie International, and another straight out of Louise Bourgeois’s wild imagination. She too was in an International exhibition in 1991, proof that the Carnegie International leaves its mark on this city in mysterious ways. The intrepid will join us over to Randyland for a real treat in Do-it-Yourself public art practice, then to the wondrous Maxo Vanka murals of St. Nicholas’s Church in Millvale. As time allows, we will heat up with tea in the 2013 Carnegie International apartment on 44th Street in Lawrenceville before heading home through the Allegheny Cemetery. By then, I assume all will be ready for lunch and de-icing in the warm galleries of the Carnegie.

 

Amazing reviews!

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013
review4

He An’s What Makes Me Understand What I Know?; Photo: Josh Franzos

reviews2

Untitled works by Vincent Fecteau; Photo: Josh Franzos

We worked hard on this show; gave everything and the last bit at the opening on October 4, 5, and 6; and then fell into a coma to wake up delighted about the amazing reviews. Pittsburgh had trembled at the thought of being bashed by New York, but New York discussed it (what bigger compliment is there?), liked it, and acknowledged some touchdowns. Roberta Smith of the New York Times: “This lean, seemingly modest, thought-out exhibition takes the big global survey of contemporary art off steroids…”; Peter Schjeldahl of The New Yorker: “The strikingly thoughtful new edition of the venerable Carnegie International…”; Andrew Russeth of the New York Observer: “The more time I spent [with the exhibition] the more I envied the people of the Steel City, who get to have it at their doorstep for the next five months.”

New York not being everything, there were (and still are coming, we’ll keep you posted) other reviews with great insights. Kerr Houston’s critique was one them for Baltimore’s Bmoreart; another one was Nessia Pope’s “A Seriously Playful Carnegie International Brings Welcome Attention to New Artistic Visions” for Artspace; a third was by Bryne McLaughlin in Canadian Art, and (not) finally, a more visual one was by Contemporary Art Daily.

Other journals, magazines, and blogs focused on individual artists like Taryn Simon (Telegraph), Zanele Muholi (Huffington Post), Mladen Stilinović (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review), Zoe Strauss in Artforum and in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Transformazium’s Art Lending Collection, Ei Arakawa/Henning Bohl’s interview, John Kane (prominently shown in the Carnegie Museum of Art’s collection reinstallation), Henry Taylor, and Dinh Q. Lê.

And the Lawrenceville Apartment Talks.

And the Collection component of the exhibitionsee this archive timeline, these archives on Tumblr and Pinterest, and this article from The Exhibitionist.

And The Playground Project in The New York Times by Carol Kino. Another great review by architect Sean Sheffler of AIA Pittsburgh.

And there were interviews and articles where we raised our voices (or they were raised for us)—a profile on Tina Kukielski, Dan Byers, and Daniel Baumann; Tom Eccles in conversation with the three co-curators for the British ArtReview; Jay Sanders in discussion with Daniel Baumann in Spike Art Quarterly.

THE catalogue!

Wednesday, October 16th, 2013

2013 carnegie international catalogue cover

This is the freshest catalogue I have seen in a long time. Artist Pierre Leguillon said that it looks like an annual report—and it somehow is: no gimmicks but full of information worth its price. Or as New York Times critic Roberta Smith put it: “excellent.” It has new texts on all artists written by Dan Byers, Amanda Donnan, Tina Kukielski, Raymund Ryan, Lauren Wetmore, and myself. You can listen to one of them here, the e-mail interview with Wade Guyton.

The catalogue contains an introduction explaining what this show is about—see an excerpt below—as well as three essays by the co-curators laying out their different points of view. Art historian Robert Bailey explores the International’s unique history and its relationship to the museum’s collection; urban planner Gabriela Burkhalter contributes a pioneering article on the history of playgrounds—with amazing pictures. You will also find a quite engaging text from 1961 by former Carnegie Museum of Art director Gordon Bailey Washburn, unaware of the transformations the 1960s were about to unfurl; a scheme about play by the French intellectual Roger Callois from 1958; an introduction to abstraction by Chicago curator Katharine Kuh from 1951; a quasi-abstract reflection on the difference between art and action by French poet Stéphane Mallarmé from 1897; an astonishingly contemporary set of claims for a better use of public space by artist Robert Rauschenberg from 1968; an ode to the power of laziness as a form of resistance by exhibition artist Mladen Stilinović from 1993; and a reflection on spam describing the conditions of our technological world by artist and writer Hito Steyerl from 2011.

And hey, 1,000 thanks go to Katie Reilly, THE&OUR director of publication and to Chad Kloepfer and Jeff Ramsey, THE designers! More pictures!

Excerpt from the introduction:
Despite social media, the Internet, and our global information economy, it still makes a difference if you live in Tehran, a village near Kraków, Johannesburg, or Los Angeles. Yet all of the artists in the exhibition, while working from and within a local context, translate their views into pictures, (more…)